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An Early Expanded Review of Brilliant Stars

Welcome back to what I’m posthumously calling Expanded January! As you’ve surely noticed, I’ve been writing a lot about Expanded lately, in addition to the videos I’m making about the format. As I keep writing, Expanded is much more interesting than Standard to me at the moment, and it kind of falls to me to shine a light on the format since few people are doing it.

That said, although I haven’t been a big fan of Standard since the start of the season, I’m very excited for Brilliant Stars. Double Turbo Energy, Lumineon V and more importantly the new VSTAR mechanic make me want to dive into it again with the hope that decks will be more varied, have multiple attackers rather than all focusing on one VMAX Pokémon and hopefully last longer and allow players to express their skill with more meaningful choices. In the Sun & Moon era, knowing when to use your GX attack (and which one, depending on the deck) was an important skill that helped create more strategic games, and I hope that VSTAR Powers will add complexity to the game in a similar way.

Brilliant Stars is still some weeks away, and its set list hasn’t been totally confirmed, so it might seem premature to look at it too closely; it’s mostly in the weeks to come that I, along with my fellow writers, will look at the Brilliant Stars format and analyze decks both old and new to help you dominate the format.

I see today’s article as a sort of mid-point letting me bridge the gap between Expanded January (if I keep saying it, it might become a thing) and the Brilliant Stars era. Today, I’ll take a look at our upcoming set from an Expanded point of view. As I often say, new sets tend to have a lesser impact on Expanded than on Standard, since they make up a much smaller part of the Expanded card pool than of the Standard card pool.

Interestingly, though, cards that have very little impact on Standard can sometimes be much better in Expanded: to give only examples that are currently Standard-legal, Coalossal VMAX, Dragonite V, Tsareena V, Volcarona V and Togekiss VMAX have all been at the center of a top tier Expanded deck, even though they’ve been pretty forgettable in Standard. This means that while yes, I’m going to write about Arceus VSTAR, some of the cards I’ll discuss won’t be the typical Standard staples. Conversely, some Standard staples will have little to no impact on Expanded. In fact, why not start with these!

 

 

Header - The Forgettable Cards

That’s right, in order to put you in the right headspace, I’ll start by explaining why some cards that are exciting for Standard are not important for Expanded, that is, for this article.

Ultra Ball (161/149)

First off: Ultra Ball. It’s already a part of the Expanded card pool! As impactful as this card will be on Standard, its reprint has no effect on Expanded.

If you’re curious, Ultra Ball is played in many decks in Expanded, but not all. Many decks focus on Quick Ball and may play a couple of Ultra Ball in addition to that, or they may have their own engine (such as Coalossal VMAX, which uses Heavy Ball and Nest Ball, or Shadow Rider which uses Fog Crystal and Mysterious Treasure). There are decks that pay four Ultra Ball in addition to Quick Ball, but it’s mostly when they want to discard cards, like Mad Party. I do think that more decks will use Ultra Ball because they’re the main way to search for VSTAR Pokémon, though.

Lumineon V – Water – HP170
Basic Pokemon

Ability: Luminous Sign
When you play this Pokemon from your hand onto your Bench during your turn, you may search your deck for a Supporter card, reveal it, and put it into your hand. Then, shuffle your deck.

[W][C][C] Aqua Return: 120 damage. Shuffle this Pokemon and all cards attached into your deck.

When your Pokemon V is Knocked Out, your opponent takes 2 Prize cards.

Weakness: Lightning (x2)
Resistance: none
Retreat: 1

Translation credit: pokebeach.com

Lumineon V is in a similar spot. Tapu Lele-GX does the same job (and it’s worth playing in many decks), but it’s better: no Weakness, a usable attack and it can be played even if your opponent has an Active Wobbuffet. Because it’s a Pokémon V and not a Pokémon-GX, Lumineon V has some benefits to it, like being immune to Great Catcher, but overall, decks should keep playing Tapu Lele-GX. The one exception is any deck that plays Dive Ball, which will work better with Lumineon V. Currently, though, no meta deck plays that card, so it’s just something to keep in mind for later.

Manaphy – Water – HP70
Basic Pokemon

Ability: Wave Veil
Prevent all damage done to your Benched Pokemon by your opponent’s attacks.

[W] Rain Splash: 20 damage.

Weakness: Lightning (x2)
Resistance: none
Retreat: 1

Translation credit: pokebeach.com

Similarly, Manaphy doesn’t bring anything new. A 70 HP Bench Barrier Pokémon is definitely playable, but it already exists: Mr. Mime (both the Psychic-type from Plasma Freeze and its Fairy-type reprint in Breakthrough) exists, but seems very little play. It is possible that Manaphy sees play at some point (although I would rather play Fairy Mr. Mime for its rare Weakness and its Dark resistance), but Abilities that protect your Bench from damage are not that good in Expanded because spread or snipe attacks like Jolteon VMAX’s are not seen as much, due to the faster pace of the format and the healing options available to decks that want them.

Bibarel – Colorless – HP120
Stage 1 – Evolves from Bidoof

Ability: Efficient Front Teeth
Once during your turn, you may draw until you have 5 cards in your hand.

[C][C][C] Tail Smash: 100 damage. Flip a coin. If tails, this attack does nothing.

Weakness: Fighting (x2)
Resistance: None
Retreat: 2

Translation credit: pokebeach.com

Bibarel also has an Ability that is welcome in Standard, but redundant in Expanded, where we already have the 90 HP Octillery from Breakthrough, and it’s not good enough to be played (except in Rapid Strike Urshifu VMAX, because that deck can also play Rapid Strike Octillery). Bibarel (and its pre-evolution Bidoof) can be searched with Winona, so you could make a case for, say, a Snorlax VMAX deck using it, but I think it would just rather play Cinccino instead.

Choice Belt – Trainer
Item

Pokemon Tool: Attach a Pokemon Tool to 1 of your Pokemon that doesn’t already have a Pokemon Tool attached.

The attacks of the Pokemon this card is attached to do 30 more damage to your opponent’s Active Pokemon V (before applying Weakness and Resistance).

You may play any number of Item cards during your turn.

Translation credit: pokebeach.com

Finally, I’d like to mention two non-Pokémon cards that should be extremely popular in Standard, but lackluster in Expanded. First, Choice Belt. While Pokémon V are making up an increasingly large part of the Expanded metagame, other Pokémon (both GX and one-Prizers) are still around too and they’re not hurt by Choice Belt. Therefore, any deck that wants a damage-boosting Tool card will choose the more versatile Muscle Band instead, unless there’s a need to hit a very specific amount of damage for a given matchup. (for example, ADP Dragonite could run Choice Belt so that Dragonite V’s Dragon Gale can OHKO Mew VMAX after Altered Creation GX, although Mew VMAX plays Pokémon Ranger so it can remove the Altered Creation boost anyway).

Double Turbo Energy (151/172)

And second, Double Turbo Energy. Any Pokémon that want to use Double Turbo Energy can instead use Double Colorless Energy in Expanded, which is strictly better. It’s not impossible that Double Turbo Energy sees play anyway, though, just because some decks want to play more than four Double Colorless Energy. Togekiss VMAX comes to mind (even though it’s not popular anymore): that deck used to play four Double Colorless Energy and four Triple Acceleration Energy, but I think Double Turbo Energy is better than Triple Acceleration Energy in that deck.

 

Header - The VSTAR Revolution

How good are VSTAR Pokémon in Expanded? In my opinion, pretty damn good.

VSTAR Pokémon, from what we’ve seen of them, have excellent stats compared to other two-Prize Pokémon. Compare Arceus VSTAR with, say, Gardevoir-GX : Arceus VSTAR has higher HP and a better attack, not to mention an incredible VSTAR Power. But it’s only a “Stage 1” (not really, but it evolves from a Basic, so it’s the same in terms of tempo), when Gardevoir-GX was a Stage 2 Pokémon, and honestly one of the best Stage 2 Pokémon of its era.

In terms of HP and power, I think VSTAR Pokémon are comparable to Tag Team Pokémon. They have the advantage of only giving up two Prizes, but on the flip side, they are Evolution Pokémon.

You might think that this is a huge downside, but honestly, Expanded decks want Evolution Pokémon. There are decks in the format which play Vileplume BUS and Pyroar FLF, so any deck that doesn’t run an Evolution Pokémon, or an alternate way to deal with these Pokémon, will have a couple of bad matchups right off the start. This is why even in times when Standard was all about Basic Pokémon, Expanded would have Evolutions everywhere: Weavile-GX in Turbo Dark, Eelektross in PikaRom, Noivern-GX in TinaChomp, etc.

It must be said that Pokémon VSTAR are much more likely to be OHKO’d than Pokémon VMAX. The difference between 280 HP and 320 HP is bigger than you’d expect, and attackers such as Dragonite V, Mad Party Bunnelby and Mew VMAX will regularly reach the former, but not the latter. That said, it’s still likely that VSTAR Pokémon see play, especially because some VSTAR Powers are incredible. The recently revealed Darkrai VSTAR, which will likely come out in our May set, already looks like the new face of Turbo Dark to me, but I’m getting ahead of myself. What about the ones in Brilliant Stars?

Arceus VSTAR (123/172)

Arceus VSTAR is the star of the show. It will probably be everywhere in Standard. I don’t think it will be nearly as impactful in Expanded, but I think it will be good. First of all, Starbirth is an incredible Ability, whether it’s to help you setup, or to look for a specific tech or counter to your opponent. Consistency wins games.

However, Trinity Nova should not be overlooked, especially since it can be used for a single Triple Acceleration Energy. Of course, because Trinity Nova attaches Basic Energy to your Pokémon, it makes no sense to use Arceus VSTAR in a deck focused on Triple Acceleration Energy or Special Energy in general (like Zoroark-GX). However, you could run only one copy (or two) of Triple Acceleration Energy, and use Starbirth to search for it on the turn you start attacking with Arceus VSTAR. Standard decks can do a similar trick with Double Turbo Energy, but I think it works even better with Triple Acceleration Energy.

Which Pokémon should partner with Arceus VSTAR? That’s a good question. Arceus VSTAR makes sense in a deck that plays other Pokémon V (because Trinity Nova only atttaches to Pokémon V), and that runs Basic Energy (and wants a way to accelerate them). Here are some ideas:

  1. A Lightning deck, similar to PikaRom: Arceus VSTAR would basically play the part of PikaRom. Would this deck play Pikachu & Zekrom-GX itself? I don’t think so. PikaRom is the worst card in PikaRom, and the deck doesn’t even try to rush the Full Blitz attack; the first few turns are usually spent attacking with Vikavolt V instead. So instead of using a three-Prize liability, we can instead use that time to evolve into a Pokémon that gives up one fewer Prize and has 40 more HP, and that can also hit the anti-Basic wall Pokémon. Trinity Nova can attach Energy to Arceus VSTAR itself, or to other attackers such as Vikavolt V and the new Raichu V. The only thing PikaRom does better than Arceus VSTAR is its access to Electropower, but since Arceus hits for 50 more damage, that’s not a huge issue. As for Tag Bolt GX, it’s not a realistic idea in most games. I think Tapu Koko-GX’s GX attack is more relevant given Shadow Rider’s effectiveness anyway.
  2. A Metal deck, in which Arceus VSTAR accelerates Energy for Zacian V. I see this as a slower approach to Speed Zacian. We can still include Bronzong and Dialga-GX, but the deck could have a long-term plan other than “hope to win before we run out of resources on turn 4.” Zacian doesn’t have a good Evolution attacker currently, and I think Arceus VSTAR could fill that role while also replacing Max Elixir.
  3. Some combination with V-Union Pokémon. Upon their reveal, many thought that Pokémon V-Union would lead to a Battle Compressor ban in Expanded given the great synergy between these cards. It turns out that, for a variety of reasons, Pokémon V-Union have failed to have a lasting impact on the format. However, Arceus V-Star could help with this. Starbirth can help get the last piece(s) of a V-Union Pokémon in the discard, including by getting Gladion if one part is Prized, and then Trinity Nova can accelerate Energy onto the Pokémon V-Union. Plus, even if you can’t get a Pokémon V-Union out, you can always attach to another Arceus VSTAR; that’s still a good attacker!

Here’s a deck list for the first of these ideas. It’s just a first draft, something to consider when you’re building your own deck list, maybe.

PTCGO Code

****** Pokémon Trading Card Game Deck List ******

##Pokémon - 13
* 1 Crobat V DAA 104
* 2 Arceus VSTAR
* 2 Arceus V
* 1 Dedenne-GX UNB 57
* 1 Tapu Koko {*} TEU 51
* 1 Tapu Koko-GX GRI 47
* 2 Vikavolt V DAA 60
* 1 Zeraora-GX LOT 86
* 1 Raichu V
* 1 Tapu Lele-GX GRI 60
##Trainer Cards - 35
* 1 Computer Search BCR 137
* 1 Thunder Mountain {*} LOT 191
* 3 Trainers' Mail ROS 92
* 1 Escape Rope BUS 114
* 4 Quick Ball SSH 179
* 1 Stormy Mountains EVS 161
* 1 Field Blower GRI 125
* 2 Guzma BUS 115
* 3 Professor Juniper DEX 98
* 4 Max Elixir BKP 102
* 2 Float Stone PLF 99
* 1 Muscle Band XY 121
* 1 N FCO 105
* 4 Electropower LOT 172
* 3 VS Seeker PHF 109
* 3 Ultra Ball DEX 102
##Energy - 12
* 11 Lightning Energy SMEnergy 4
* 1 Triple Acceleration Energy UNB 190

Total Cards - 60

****** Deck List Generated by the Pokémon TCG Online www.pokemon.com/TCGO ******

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I’ve rambled about Arceus VSTAR long enough, but are the other VSTAR Pokémon playable too? I’m not too confident about it. Glaceon and Shaymin are not good enough. Whimsicott VSTAR’s attack is much less interesting in a format which can counter it with Pokémon Ranger, and I don’t think Shadow Rider would want to make space for it. Leafeon VSTAR only makes sense in a deck that plays Leafeon VMAX, or at least Leafeon V. It’s possible to include Leafeon V in a Tsareena V deck for its Ability, so it’s, in theory, possible to run Leafeon VSTAR in that deck. I don’t think it’s optimal, but it’s not the worst idea in the world!

Charizard VSTAR (018/172)

And then there’s Charizard VSTAR. I actually think this card is good, maybe even very good. But that’s not just due to its own characteristics, but to the power of Fire decks, which deserves its own section.

 

Header - The Future Burns Bright

Magma Basin (144/172)

Fire-type Pokémon have a lot to look forward to, and it’s all thanks to one card: Magma Basin. This is exactly the kind of card that can have a huge impact on the Expanded format: it’s Energy acceleration, in the form of a Stadium, which is hard to counter. It share these characteristics with Dimension Valley, a card that, every now and then, becomes a fundamental part of a top tier deck. Is Magma Basin headed for similar glory? It’s possible.

In Expanded, the Fire type has access to a great form of Energy acceleration in Welder, a card which once dominated Standard. Welder decks have had some success in Expanded, but relying on a specific Supporter was always an issue. If you’re playing Welder, then you’re not playing Guzma to target a Benched Pokémon, or N to disrupt your opponent. But thanks to Magma Basin, Fire decks have an alternate way to attach more Energy, which means they’re not as reliant on Welder and don’t have to play it every turn.

Charizard VSTAR (018/172)

With Welder and Magma Basin, you can attach up to four Fire Energy per turn, so you can play pretty much any Fire Pokémon. Charizard VSTAR is a great main attacker: it deals a pretty impressive 230 damage for one Energy, or 320 once per game with Star Blaze. Remember, this can all be powered up in one single turn! Since your main attacker is an Evolution Pokémon, you don’t have issues with Pyroar or Vileplume, which have been a issue for Fire decks when they relied on Reshiram & Charizard-GX.

Of course, you can play other Pokémon in addition to Charizard VSTAR. Moltres will be a common partner to it in Standard thanks to its synergy with Magma Basin, and it could also be decent in Expanded, especially if it increases its damage output with Volcanion-EX. However, I think the Pokémon that can best exploit the powerful Energy acceleration of the deck is Blacephalon-GX. Not only does it give the deck a good GX attack, it can also turn the Energy in play into fuel for a massive Mind Blown attack.

Again, here’s a first draft using these thoughts:

PTCGO Code

****** Pokémon Trading Card Game Deck List ******

##Pokémon - 14
* 1 Crobat V DAA 104
* 2 Blacephalon-GX LOT 52
* 1 Moltres
* 3 Charizard VSTAR
* 3 Charizard V DAA 19
* 1 Dedenne-GX UNB 57
* 1 Tapu Lele-GX GRI 60
* 2 Volcanion-EX STS 26
##Trainer Cards - 33
* 1 Heat Factory {*} LOT 178
* 1 Computer Search BCR 137
* 1 N DEX 96
* 3 Welder UNB 189
* 4 Magma Basin
* 4 Ultra Ball DEX 102
* 4 Quick Ball SSH 179
* 2 Guzma BUS 115
* 2 Professor Juniper DEX 98
* 3 Float Stone PLF 99
* 4 Fire Crystal UNB 173
* 1 Muscle Band XY 121
* 3 VS Seeker PHF 109
##Energy - 13
* 13 Fire Energy SMEnergy 2

Total Cards - 60

****** Deck List Generated by the Pokémon TCG Online www.pokemon.com/TCGO ******

[collapse]

I’m not sure how important Volcanion-EX is to the deck (it can’t increase Charizard VSTAR’s damage), so maybe the list will have to change to better take that into account. You could also make a case for other attackers, including Ninetales V and Volcarona V. I’m not even sure that Heat Factory Prism Star is worth playing in this deck, just because it’s not a Magma Basin!

There are many more Fire attackers, and they don’t necessarily fit in this sort of deck. For example, Blacephalon could use Magma Basin to be less reliant on Welder. That’s not the only issue Blacephalon has in Expanded (its reliance on Items such as Fire Crystal and Fiery Flint, for example, makes it pretty weak against any deck which can deny them), but it’s a start, so maybe this once fantastic one-Prize attacker can find a portion of its former glory?

 

Header - Empoleon Dives Back

Empoleon – Water – HP160
Stage 2 – Evolves from Prinplup

Ability: Emergency Ascent
Once during your turn, if this card is in your discard pile and you have no cards in your hand, you can play this card onto your Bench then draw 3 cards.

[W] Water Arrow: This attack does 60 damage to 1 of your opponent’s Pokemon (don’t apply Weakness and Resistance).

Weakness: Lightning (x2)
Resistance: none
Retreat: 2

Translation credit: pokebeach.com

There are a number of cards that may have an impact in Expanded, but one that I’m very hopeful about is Empoleon. It’s a Pokémon that can come back from the discard and draw cards. This is good because Expanded has very powerful forms of hand disruption, mostly N, which can turn a game around. If you’re playing an aggressive, all-in deck like Mad Party, Empoleon is perfect for you. You can discard it with a Battle Compressor, and if you ever get N’d to one card, as long as you can empty your hand, you can bring Empoleon back from the discard and, more importantly, draw three cards. I’m a huge advocate for playing the Sun & Moon Oranguru in Mad Party, which has won me many games. Empoleon offers a similar sense of security, except it only needs to be in the discard, the opponent can’t Knock it Out to prevent its Ability, and it’s not blocked by Silent Lab or Alolan Muk.

While many decks can use Empoleon, I think one deck in particular will definitely, 100 percent include it: Tsareena V. That deck is based on the idea of bringing Pokémon back from the discard anyway, so Empoleon fits ridiculously well. You can bring it back with its Ability, draw cards, discard it with Queen’s Orders and have it available for later on. I won’t go as far as to suggest to base your whole draw engine on Empoleon, but I definitely think that every Tsareena deck should play at least one. You could even try to change the Energy base to give Empoleon the ability to attack, since it could be used to counter Sudowoodo (Tsareena’s mortal enemy) and hit Pyroar and Vileplume.

Here is a possible take on the deck:

PTCGO Code

****** Pokémon Trading Card Game Deck List ******

##Pokémon - 21
* 1 Dragonite-EX EVO 72
* 1 Absol ROS 40
* 1 Crobat V DAA 104
* 1 Sudowoodo GRI 66
* 1 Leafeon VSTAR PR-SW 195
* 1 Eldegoss V RCL 19
* 1 Exeggcute PLF 4
* 1 Leafeon V EVS 7
* 3 Tsareena V FST 21
* 1 Dedenne-GX UNB 57
* 1 Tapu Koko {*} TEU 51
* 4 Giratina LOT 97
* 2 Mew FCO 29
* 1 Tapu Lele-GX GRI 60
* 1 Empoleon
##Trainer Cards - 31
* 2 Rescue Stretcher GRI 130
* 4 Ultra Ball DEX 102
* 1 N DEX 96
* 4 Quick Ball SSH 179
* 4 Battle Compressor Team Flare Gear PHF 92
* 1 Raihan EVS 152
* 1 Field Blower GRI 125
* 1 Guzma BUS 115
* 1 Professor Juniper DEX 98
* 1 Colress PLS 118
* 4 Sky Field ROS 89
* 2 Float Stone BKT 137
* 1 Escape Rope BUS 114
* 1 Dowsing Machine PLS 128
* 3 VS Seeker PHF 109
##Energy - 8
* 5 Grass Energy SWSHEnergy 1
* 3 Lightning Energy SWSHEnergy 4

Total Cards - 60

****** Deck List Generated by the Pokémon TCG Online www.pokemon.com/TCGO ******

[collapse]

I’ve included the Leafeon VSTAR idea I mentioned earlier in this article just to make the deck a bit newer. The 1-1 line honestly does quite a bit for the deck: it accelerates Energy on turn one, it gives the deck a good VSTAR Power, it can help deal with Sudowoodo and it can act as a secondary attacker against Pyroar and Vileplume.

 

Header - Other Good Cards

Finally, here, in no particular order, other cards from Brillant Stars that can be played in Expanded :

  • Alcremie: This Pokémon is the newest in a long line of cards that look so good with Ho-Oh-EX. Ho-Oh-EX + Battle Compressor is one of these Expanded-only ideas that comes back every once in a while, most recently with Ninja Boy and Amazing Pokémon. It can let a player bring back many Basic Energy of various types, which is exactly what Alcremie can use to deal up to 370 damage. Alcremie’s Ability means that Café Master is playable in this deck. It shouldn’t be the focus of the deck, but you can play it as a 1-of and get it when you need it thanks to Tapu Lele-GX and VS Seeker; if you only rely on Ho-Oh-EX, you’ll be limited by the lack of Bench space at some point. Overall, while I don’t think this will be a top tier deck at all, it has potential to be a fun rogue deck.
  • Wormadam: Another stage 1 attacker that attacks for two Colorless Energy, Wormadam is the successor to Vespiquen, once a top tier Expanded deck. While you can choose between three types to attack (since all three Wormadam have the same attack), Grass and Metal are not great attacking types, so that variety is a bit useless. You could run the Eeveelutions from Ancient Origins to have the opportunity to hit more Weaknesses, though.
    • The reason why I’m focusing on the idea of hitting for Weakness is that Wormadam just doesn’t hit hard enough otherwise. The power creep has hit it too hard, and it needs something more to be relevant, especially compared to Mad Party which has a similar concept, but whose damage ramps up much faster.
  • In any new set, if you’re looking for Expanded gems that Standard players won’t look at twice, you can look among the Dragon Pokémon. Double Dragon Energy gives Pokémon like Dragonite V and Noivern-GX an efficiency they never had in Standard. Brilliant Stars features mostly Flygon V, which can deal 320 damage to a Pokémon VMAX: that’s the kind of high damage that would fit right in a deck like ADP. However, right now, there doesn’t seem to be any practical way to power up this attack efficiently and reliably, since it requires two Double Dragon Energy. I have some hope for this card in the future, and I think it’s worth keeping in mind, but it’s definitely not a staple.
  • Pachirisu could, in theory, be a fun little deck. Its attack is easier to use in Expanded thanks to Thunder Mountain Prism Star and Tapu Koko Prism Star, and you can use Sigilyph PLB instead of Honchkrow V to hold your Pokémon Tools (it’s better because its Ability isn’t shut down by Wobbuffet or Path to the Peak). It’s not going to be competitive because it requires too many resources to trade efficiently with other decks, and it’s vulnerable to several strategies, especially Item lock, but again, if you like rogue decks, it’s one you can build easily and for cheap.
  • There are a couple of Trainer cards from the set that could see play. I could see Acerola’s Premonition being played in Eggrow or some sort of Stall or Control deck, and Cynthia’s Ambition is a decent card but I struggle to think of a deck that would play it over some other, more reliable Supporter.

 

Header - Conclusion

If you skimmed the article, here’s the bottom line: Pokémon VSTAR are a good concept and will see play, but some of them are too weak for Expanded. The three most impactful cards of the set are, in no particular order, Arceus VSTAR, Magma Basin and Empoleon. There are a lot of new rogue decks that you can also build, but I don’t think they’ll have a huge impact.

I’m excited for Brilliant Stars both in regards to Standard and Expanded. VSTAR Pokémon will definitely have a bigger impact on Standard, but there are other cards that I can’t wait to try in Expanded. I also can’t wait to see what better deck builders than me will imagine!

Thank you for reading and see you next time, when I’ll definitely write about Standard, for sure!

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