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Cheat Sheet for Eldritch Moon Limited

When Shadows over Innistrad came out, I introduced you to my way of getting acquainted with new cards by shortcutting—to reduce the amount of thinking in a game or during the Draft. I’m going to do the same for Eldritch Moon, but the format consists of 2 Eldritch Moon and 1 Shadows over Innistrad pack (4 Eldritch Moon 2 Shadows over Innistrad for Sealed), which means you’ll need my previous Cheat Sheet article. Use it intelligently, though. Remember Shadows is only one pack of the draft, and the final one. It’s also a big set while Eldritch Moon is a small one, which means that Shadows over Innistrad’s cards are seen in far fewer copies.

Let’s get to it.

Commons and Uncommons

Do not play around rares and mythics unless you see them in the draft. You wouldn’t want to risk yourself playing into a common or uncommon because you tried to play around a card they’re unlikely to have—only do it if you’ve already covered all of the most likely tricks.

I ran the numbers, so I know the average number of each common and uncommon cards opened in a draft (flip cards set aside for now):

  • Average number of each common opened in a draft (with 70 different commons in the set), 16 packs opened, 9 per pack=144 per draft=2.05 of each common per draft.
  • Average number of each uncommon opened in a draft (with 60 different uncommons in the set), 16 packs opened, 3 per pack=48 per draft=0.80 of each uncommon per draft.

An update on Shadows over Innistrad, with only 1 pack:

  • Average number of each common opened in a draft (with 105 different commons in the set), 8 packs opened, 9 per pack=72 per draft=0.68 of each common per draft.
  • Average number of each uncommon opened in a draft (with 100 different uncommons in the set), 8 packs opened, 3 per pack=24 per draft=0.24 of each uncommon per draft.

Flip Cards

There are 10 uncommon and 4 common flip cards. 2/3 of the time you get an uncommon and 1/3 of the time a common (there is always exactly 1 C/U flip card in every pack). That includes the 6 meld cards (3 pairs) as flip cards. It was the case for Shadows over Innistrad—I haven’t gotten confirmation that it was still the same ratio for Eldritch Moon, so take it as a guess.

  • Average number of each common flip card opened in a draft (with 4 different flip commons in the set), 16 packs opened, 1/3 per pack=5 per draft=1.25 of each common per draft.
  • Average number of each uncommon flip card opened in a draft (with 10 different flip uncommons in the set), 16 packs opened, 2/3 per pack=11 per draft=1.10 of each uncommon per draft.

Creatures on Curve

It is instrumental to know how many creatures there are at each casting cost when drafting your deck. You don’t need to know the exact number, but noticing which colors have few and which have many will help when you’re debating between picks.

Note that these are separated by rarity, since the common ones should be more heavily considered than uncommons. Also, 1- and 2-drops are considered the same, since, except in rare cases, they accomplish the same goal—having an early play.

White Common

1- or 2-Drop

3-Drop

4-Drop

5-Drop

White Uncommon

2-Drop

3-Drop

4-Drop

6-Drop

Blue Common

2-Drop

3-Drop

4-Drop

6-Drops+

Blue Uncommon

2-Drop

3-Drop

5-Drop

6+ -Drop

Black Common

2-Drop

3-Drop

4-Drop

5-Drop

Black Uncommon

1-Drop

3-Drop

4-Drop

5-Drop

6+ Drop

Red Common

1- or 2-Drop

3-Drop

4-Drop

5-Drop

Red Uncommon

2-Drop

3-Drop

4-Drop

Green Common

1- or 2-Drop

3-Drop

4-Drop

6+ Drop

Green Uncommon

1- or 2-Drop

3-Drop

4-Drop

5-Drop

6+ Drop

Looking at it this way can be a little overwhelming. Here’s a more compact version:

  • White has a total of two-drops, three-drops, four-drops, five-drop, and six-drop
  • Blue has total of two-drops, 5 three-drops, four-drops, five-drop, and six+ drops
  • Black has a total of two-drops, three-drops, 3 four-drops, five-drops, and six+ drops
  • Red has a total of two-drops, three-drops, four-drops, and five-drop
  • Green has a total of two-drops, three-drops, four-drops, five-drop, and six+ drops

This only includes Eldritch Moon and that’s a flaw in my system. Instead, I should be looking at proportionally distributed numbers. In this case, 2/3 for Eldritch Moon and 1/3 for Shadows over Innistrad.

  • White has a total of 5.33 two-drops5.33 three-drops, 3.66 four-drops, 1.33 five-drops, 0.66 six-drops
  • Blue has a total of 3.33 two-drops4.66 three-drops, 3 four-drops, 1.33 five-drops, 2 six+ drops
  • Black has a total of 4.33 two-drops3.66 three-drops, 3.66 four-drops, 1.66 five-drops, 1.66 six+ drops
  • Red has a total of 4.33 two-drops4.33 three-drops, 3.33 four-drops, 1.33 five-drops,
  • Green has a total of 7 two-drops4.33 three-drops, 3.33 four-drops, 1.66 five-drops, 1.66 six+ drops

An example of how you can use the above is when drafting blue, you will see a small amount of 4-drops, which means you should snag them when you can, or rely on your second color to fill that slot.

Instant-Speed Cards to Play Around

During the draft, once you’ve chosen your card, don’t put down the pack yet. Use the list shown below to know what to play around. It’s hard to actually remember all of these (plus the Shadows over Innistrad ones, which can be found in the last edition of Cheat Sheet), so when it’s fresh in your memory after the draft, look at this list below and note the number of each that you saw.

I like to note draw spells as well—they’re here because even though they are not tricks, if my opponent passes with 4 mana up, it’s useful to know that they might just be casting a draw spell rather than representing something threatening (Fortune’s Favor and Scour the Laboratory).

Don’t play around bad cards such as Displace and Turn Aside. Unless you saw them or have a reason to think your opponent would play it (i.e., you’re playing a removal-heavy deck).

The madness cards are listed. Only play around them when your opponent has a discard outlet in play.

White

Blue

Black

Red

Green

Multicolor

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