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Mind-Boggling Technology – 12-Post Walkthrough

I’m sure you have all heard about the new kid on the block- 12 Post. We have many different versions of it, but they are all pretty strong. This will probably be another case of everyone trying their own brews at the beginning, but there ends up being an accepted best list as the format develops.

Lets run through the possible iterations of the deck before we begin.

[deck]2 Breeding Pool
4 Cloudpost
1 Eye of Ugin
1 Flooded Grove
2 Forest
4 Glimmerpost
2 Island
3 Misty Rainforest
2 Scalding Tarn
4 Vesuva
1 Emrakul, the Aeons Torn
4 Primeval Titan
1 Ulamog, the Infinite Gyre
1 Wurmcoil Engine
2 All Is Dust
2 Beast Within
4 Condescend
1 Engineered Explosives
4 Expedition Map
4 Explore
4 Remand
4 Simic Signet
3 Thirst for Knowledge
Sideboard
2 Annex
3 Bribery
2 Chalice of the Void
2 Nature’s Claim
4 Tectonic Edge
2 Trickbind[/deck]

Here’s the more controlling version of the deck. It has the capability to cast draw spells and countermagic in order to make the deck more consistent. The downfall of the deck is the reduced explosiveness. The traditional ramping walls have been removed in favor of [card]Remand[/card] and [card]Condescend[/card]. The mirror matchup is sacrificed in exchange for a better time against combo.

[deck]4 Cloudpost
1 Dryad Arbor
1 Eye of Ugin
12 Forest
4 Glimmerpost
4 Vesuva
1 Emrakul, the Aeons Torn
1 Eternal Witness
1 Magus of the Candelabra
1 Oracle of Mul Daya
4 Overgrown Battlement
4 Primeval Titan
1 Terastodon
1 Ulamog, the Infinite Gyre
4 Wall of Roots
1 Wurmcoil Engine
2 Ancient Stirrings
1 Expedition Map
4 Explore
4 Green Sun’s Zenith
2 Reap and Sow
2 Summoning Trap
Sideboard
1 Acidic Slime
3 Beast Within
1 Emrakul, the Aeons Torn
2 Obstinate Baloth
4 Plow Under
2 Ratchet Bomb
2 Summoning Trap[/deck]

This is the most basic version of the deck because it decides to focus primarily on the combo. I think of this deck like Valakut in Standard because it’s so dedicated to resolving [card]Primeval Titan[/card]. [card]Green Sun’s Zenith[/card] can fetch X=0 [card]Dryad Arbor[/card] X=1 [card]Magus of the Candelabra[/card] X=2 [card]Wall of Roots[/card] and [card]Overgrown Battlement[/card] X=3 [card]Eternal Witness[/card] X=4 [card]Oracle of Mul Daya[/card] X=6 [card]Primeval Titan[/card] X= 8 [card]Terastodon[/card]

I’m not a huge fan of [card]Ancient Stirrings[/card] because the land is not put directly into play. It doesn’t even guarantee you a [card]Cloudpost[/card] or [card]Vesuva[/card]. I prefer [card]Expedition Map[/card] because it gets you the [card]Cloudpost[/card] or [card]Eye of Ugin[/card] you are looking for and also costs colorless mana.

I like that this list only plays two Eldrazi monsters because they are just clunky a majority of the time. You rarely want to search for [card kozilek, butcher of truth]Kozilek[/card] because the best spells you can hope to draw are the other targets for Eye.

There’s an infinite combo in the deck when you play two [card Emrakul, the aeons torn]Emrakuls[/card], but it’s overkill 99.9% of the time. You can attack with one Emrakul and fetch up the second copy and take another turn. The legend rule will kill both of them which means they get shuffled back into your deck. The extra turn you take will involve searching up the first Emrakul then rinse and repeat.

[card]Magus of the Candelabra[/card] largely seems like an overkill card to me as well. This deck is dangerous because it requires you to play expensive threats, but doesn’t tell you the limit. 12-Post decks seem to be filled with cards that are simply unnecessary in the early stages of the format which is to be expected; I feel that Magus falls into this category.

I also tried out [card]Eternal Witness[/card] since I love that card with [card]Green Sun’s Zenith[/card], but was not impressed at all. The common situation with Zenith was that I either cast it for a ramp spell such as [card]Wall of Roots[/card], [card]Overgrown Battlement[/card], or [card]Dryad Arbor[/card] or a game-ending threat such as [card]Primeval Titan[/card]. [card]Eternal Witness[/card] fell into an awkward sub-category since if you have enough mana to re-cast the spell you should just fetch [card]Primeval Titan[/card] anyway.

[card]Reap and Sow[/card] is clutch in the mirror because it often comes down to a degenerate race of land destruction spells. This spell allows you to sculpt your mirror match game plan as well as fetching [card]Cloudpost[/card] or [card]Glimmerpost[/card]. There are certain matchups such as burn or Zoo where the best play with the card is to ramp and gain some life in the process. It’s only one more mana than [card]Expedition Map[/card] and the land comes directly into play untapped so the card is clearly worth some slots. It gets better when the mirror match is popular which is currently the situation.

This is a pretty basic land base for the Mono Green list. You can opt to play some techy lands such as [card]Horizon Canopy[/card], [card]Tectonic Edge[/card], or [card]Ghost Quarter[/card]. This will take away from your Forest count so don’t go too wild with it. I play this deck like I play Valakut in Standard; mulligan hands without green sources.

[deck]4 Cloudpost
1 Dryad Arbor
1 Eye of Ugin
10 Forest
4 Glimmerpost
2 Horizon Canopy
4 Vesuva
3 Emrakul, the Aeons Torn
4 Overgrown Battlement
4 Primeval Titan
1 Ulamog, the Infinite Gyre
4 Expedition Map
4 Explore
4 Green Sun’s Zenith
1 Karn Liberated
1 Reap and Sow
3 Simic Signet
4 Sylvan Scrying
1 Tooth and Nail
Sideboard
1 Bojuka Bog
2 Life from the Loam
3 Nature’s Claim
4 Plow Under
4 Trinisphere
1 Wurmcoil Engine[/deck]

Here we have a [card]Tooth and Nail[/card] version that looks like it came straight out of 2005. Four copies of [card]Sylvan Scrying[/card] and [card]Expedition Map[/card] will ensure you get plenty of mana to cast an early Emrakul. I can see this deck being good when the hate is low for the deck because it’s abnormally susceptible to land destruction. There are also hands where you just draw two eldrazi monsters and that just doesn’t feel very good. I would probably play more [card]Tooth and Nail[/card]s in this deck because you will often have a huge monster in hand due to the high threat density.

[deck]1 Breeding Pool
4 Cloudpost
1 Dryad Arbor
1 Eye of Ugin
4 Forest
4 Glimmerpost
1 Island
4 Misty Rainforest
4 Vesuva
2 Emrakul, the Aeons Torn
1 Eternal Witness
1 Oracle of Mul Daya
3 Primeval Titan
4 Sakura-Tribe Elder
1 Triskelion
2 All Is Dust
3 Expedition Map
4 Explore
4 Green Sun’s Zenith
1 Karn Liberated
4 Scapeshift
3 Simic Signet
3 Thirst for Knowledge
Sideboard
3 Nature’s Claim
1 Obstinate Baloth
1 Phyrexian Metamorph
1 Tilling Treefolk
4 Trinisphere
4 Vedalken Plotter
1 Wurmcoil Engine[/deck]

Another avenue to victory that’s seeing some play lies within [card]Scapeshift[/card]. I have seen other versions that play [card]Amulet of Vigor[/card] to ensure a quick victory.

Turn 1: [card]Amulet of Vigor[/card] Turn 2: [card]Sakura-Tribe Elder[/card] Turn 3: [card]Scapeshift[/card] for 4 searching 4 [card]Cloudpost[/card]s allowing you to generate 16 mana!

This mana can be used on all of the usual suspects such as Emrakul or Karn. I think this is another version of the deck that falls into the “too cute” category, but it looks like a blast to play.

Here is the version that I’m currently playing.

[deck]3 Overgrown Battlement
4 Wall of Roots
1 Emrakul, the Aeons Torn
4 Primeval Titan
1 Kitchen Finks
3 Explore
4 Green Sun’s Zenith
2 Primal Command
1 Karn Liberated
1 Ulamog, the Infinite Gyre
2 Expedition Map
3 Reap and Sow
4 Beast Within
1 Eye of Ugin
4 Cloudpost
4 Glimmerpost
4 Vesuva
1 Horizon Canopy
11 Forest
2 Dryad Arbor
Sideboard
3 Plow Under
2 Dismember
2 Nature’s Claim
1 Gaddock Teeg
2 Ghost Quarter
2 Kitchen Finks
1 Obstinate Baloth
2 Summoning Trap[/deck]

I have tried many versions of the deck and feel that this list runs smoothly. [card]Karn Liberated[/card] sticks out like a sore thumb because there’s not a way to search for it and could be replaced by a [card]Terastodon[/card]. That could help the [card]Summoning Trap[/card] plan in the sideboard as well as have an out to an impending combo with [card]Green Sun’s Zenith[/card] by destroying their lands. Don’t be afraid to be aggro with [card]Beast Within[/card] because the game will end pretty quickly and the damage rarely matters. I have not lost to my beast tokens yet.

Some of the other big bombs have been replaced by [card]Primal Command[/card] because it fits in with the land denial plan for the mirror. The 7 life and fetching [card]Kitchen Finks[/card] can be a game breaker against Zoo and Burn. It can also just fetch a [card]Primeval Titan[/card] from your deck the turn before it can be cast anyway (assuming you cast it with just 5 mana). I liked it better than maindeck [card]Plow Under[/card] because of all the extra stuff it can do against the field.

Most lists don’t play 2 [card]Dryad Arbor[/card], but I either wanted to cast it for 0,2, or 6 almost every time. There was a time where I tried a [card]Birds of Paradise[/card] in order to be able to Zenith for something good when X=1, but [card]Dryad Arbor[/card] is better. [card]Magus of the Candelabra[/card] does not ramp in the early game so I wanted to exclude it.

[card]Horizon Canopy[/card] is my cute land of choice because of the [card]Gaddock Teeg[/card] in the sideboard. It provides you with a way to hard cast it if you were unlucky enough to draw it. There have also been numerous times already where I wanted to sacrifice it for a card; there’s so much mana in this deck.

The miser’s [card]Kitchen Finks[/card] is for [card]Green Sun’s Zenith[/card]; it’s one of the few cards I actually think is worth tutoring. Life gain is important against Zoo and Burn so one dead slot against isn’t the end of the world. Don’t forget that it can block the [card]Beast Within[/card] Token as well.

The main cards I chose to exclude are the sweepers- [card]Oblivion Stone[/card] and [card]All is Dust[/card]. I had them in my maindeck for a short period of time, but they kept being swapped for [card]Beast Within[/card]. Eventually I moved them to the sideboard, but they were awkward and I didn’t want to board them. The reason for the awkwardness is the fact that they kill [card]Overgrown Battlement[/card] and [card]Wall of Roots[/card] and those are rarely taken out. I would rather stop creature decks by blocking and stalling with [card]Beast Within[/card] because this is not a control deck. The more time you are given the worse it is for the opponent.

I wrote an article on TCG Player about how to beat [card]Cloudpost[/card] and I didn’t really accomplish my goal. The decks I made were creature decks that attempted to disrupt the opponent as well as provide some fast clocks. After playing the Post deck more, I found some decks that can be tough for me.

Splinter Twin

If you thought this was just a Standard deck you better think again. I would say this is the premier blue combo deck at the moment. This can change suddenly because each combo deck gets weaker as becomes more popular. The true best combo deck is something I don’t even know exists in the format yet. Maybe it’s Dragonstorm or perhaps it’s Hive Mind, but it’s certainly under the radar.

[deck]3 Dreadship Reef
5 Island
1 Molten Slagheap
3 Mountain
4 Scalding Tarn
3 Shivan Reef
4 Steam Vents
4 Deceiver Exarch
2 Kiki-Jiki, Mirror Breaker
3 Pestermite
4 Cryptic Command
2 Echoing Truth
3 Gigadrowse
4 Ponder
4 Preordain
4 Remand
3 Spell Pierce
4 Splinter Twin
Sideboard
2 Bribery
3 Lightning Bolt
3 Pyroclasm
3 Relic of Progenitus
4 Spreading Seas[/deck]

Jafurait piloted this deck to a 4-0 finish in a recent Daily Event. The deck has spiked in popularity due to the fact that it can compete with Cloudpost. We are seeing the format shift from Zoo variants to combo decks. It’s just not a good time to play a fair deck right now because you will face degenerate combos all day.

This deck operates very similarly to the Standard version with the exception that it needs to win faster. We do not have the luxury to sit around and sculpt an unbeatable 7 card hand that’s backed by multiple [card]Dispel[/card]s. You have to win fast so you don’t get killed by an opposing combo or gang of angry creatures.

The fact that Splinter Twin is more open to running out the naked combo gives us a clear route to victory. Cards like [card]Dismember[/card], [card]Nature’s Claim[/card], and [card]Beast Within[/card] make the matchup pretty fair because it becomes more interactive. They cannot even tap you out if there’s a [card]Wall of Roots[/card] in play because you can get mana off of it on their turn.

Land destruction is also one of the few ways to successfully tap out against Splinter Twin. Usually when you tap out, the Splinter Twin opponent will simply play [card]Deceiver Exarch[/card] followed by [card]Splinter Twin[/card]. When you cast a [card]Reap and Sow[/card], they can cast their creature in response, but won’t have access to the fourth land next turn. This plan also stops them from casting [card]Bribery[/card] for an [card emrakul, the aeons torn]Emrakul[/card] for the win because it’s so expensive (UU3).

Some would say that the addition of [card]Bribery[/card] alone can justify the blue version of Cloudpost, but [card]Plow Under[/card] is just as back breaking. The card basically gives you a double [card]Time Walk[/card] when the rest of your deck is mana, threats, and more land destruction. You cannot play both of them because Plow and Bribery are so much mana; it comes down to a splash for a slight upgrade.

The addition of 12-Post to the format has certainly sparked some crazy decks.

[deck]1 Forest
4 Inkmoth Nexus
5 Island
3 Misty Rainforest
1 Mountain
4 Scalding Tarn
2 Verdant Catacombs
4 Blighted Agent
4 Glistener Elf
4 Reaper King
4 Blazing Shoal
4 Gitaxian Probe
4 Peer Through Depths
4 Ponder
4 Preordain
4 Spell Pierce
4 Summoner’s Pact
Sideboard
4 Chalice of the Void
4 Emrakul, the Aeons Torn
3 Mindbreak Trap
4 Through the Breach[/deck]

I thought this deck was a joke the first time I played against it in a 2-man.

turn 1: [card]Inkmoth Nexus[/card] turn 2: [card]Gitaxian Probe[/card] me, play land, animate and attack. Cast [card]Blazing Shoal[/card] removing [card]Reaper King[/card].

The next game went exactly the same way so I took a total of 3 turns in the match (apparently this is no joke). I’m not sure how real this deck will be when everyone knows what’s going on, but it’s very fast and consistent. The existence of this deck made me want to add [card]Dismember[/card] to the sideboard.

Here’s how I would board against the popular decks.

Zoo:
+2 [card]Kitchen Finks[/card] +1 [card]Obstinate Baloth[/card] -1 [card]Karn Liberated[/card] -2 [card]Beast Within[/card]

Mirror:
+3 [card]Plow Under[/card] +2 [card]Ghost Quarter[/card] -2 [card]Glimmerpost[/card] (This is the worst card to draw in the mirror because it ramps their Cloudpost before you get to cast something with yours.)
– 1 [card]Kitchen Finks[/card] -1 [card]Karn Liberated[/card] -1 [card]Expedition Map[/card]

Splinter Twin:
+2 [card]Dismember[/card] +2 [card]Nature’s Claim[/card] +2 [card]Summoning Trap[/card] +1 [card]Gaddock Teeg[/card] +2 [card]Plow Under[/card] -1 [card]Kitchen Finks[/card] -2 [card]Expedition Map[/card] -3 [card]Explore[/card] -1 [card]Karn Liberated[/card] -2 [card]Primal Command[/card]

Poison Combo:
+2 [card]Dismember[/card] +1 [card]Gaddock Teeg[/card] +2 [card]Nature’s Claim[/card] -1 [card]Kitchen Finks[/card] -2 [card]Primal Command[/card] (cannot target their [card]Inkmoth Nexus[/card] because they can animate it in response and fizzle the spell) -1 [card]Reap and Sow[/card] -1 [card]Overgrown Battlement[/card]

This deck can be tricky at times, but anyone (including me) can win with it. Don’t be afraid to mulligan aggressively because you can get some rancid hands due to having clunkers in your deck.

That’s all for this week! I hope you guys will give this deck a try or at least be prepared for it at your next Modern Event.

Thanks for reading.

Kyle

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